Does the Amount of Property Damage to Your Car Matter in Your Injury Case and What Myths Do People Presume to be True?

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According to medical documentation provided by neurologists and orthopedists, there is no direct correlation between the amount of property damage in an accident and the type and severity of injuries received. Everyone has a different injury tolerance, and it is very common for two people who experience the same accident to have different injuries. That is because everyone — biologically speaking — is built differently. Some people may have a genetic tendency to be more car accident victim in wheelchairpredisposed to certain types of injuries. For example, women tend sustain different types of injuries than men. Also, the fitness level of an individual can have a lot to do with the type and severity of injury received in an accident. As such, factors like wear and tear on the body and the actual individual’s injury tolerance, which is genetic, bears no relationship to the amount of property damage in an auto case.

However, you need to be aware that jurors in a court case may be of the opinion that in order for a person to be injured in a crash, there must be substantial, visible property damage to the vehicles involved. This could not be further from the truth because many cars are designed to hide property damage to the vehicles. This should not be construed to mean that car manufacturers don’t want people to know the extent of actual damage to their vehicles, but rather that the manufacturers make cars with plastic bumper covers and things of that nature that can easily be replaced if the damage to the vehicle is minimal. In this way, automakers attempt to save people money by making their cars so that minor damage can be repaired simply and easily. For example, not having to have an entire bumper replaced if someone accidentally backed up into a pole or hit their child’s basketball net when backing out of their driveway.

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